Top reads for the week ending 8 Nov 15

5 top readsPWC Releases – Board Practices and Priorities– the results of the 2015 Annual Directors survey have been released. This is a comprehensive report on the reflections of Board Directors in the area of board practices and priorities provides a valuable pointer to areas for improvement. This release is a small part of larger report by PWC which is also worth reviewing.

I want at least 3 people in my team to apply for my job when I leave – this article exposes the fears of a lot of NFP leaders, who are looking for someone to replace them when the time cames for them to move on.

The artciles stresses the need to promote the NFP sector as a sector that grows, nurtures and invests in leadership. It identifies some of the work being done in the UK to establish development programs for staff and new graduates so that NFP have in place effective succession plans for senior leaders.

The UK agency Charity Works is also highlighted as an effective strategy to build a ‘funnel’ of experienced and capable NFP future leaders. Charity Works is a single source for entry for new graduates wanting to complete a 12 month development program.

7 Actions a CEO can take right now to protect their data and networks – The role of the CEO is likened to a ‘banker’ in charge of the money, or in this analogy the key assets of the organisation. This article identifies some practical strategies for protecting organsation data and networks. The tips are easy to implement and represented good practice.

The article argues that Board need to shift their thinking and stop seeing cybersecurity as an IT issue and instead embrace it as part of the organisations enterprise risk strategy.

Why the world still needs nonprofits – another great story from The Conversation. This one explores the trend among donors to direct giving to those in need bypassing charities altogether.

The reasons for this are related to concerns about ‘overheads’ and believing those in need know best what is needed. The article explores these beliefs and puts together some compelling arguements about the compounding benefits of charities/not for profits.

It is somewhat timely this debate given the aged care sectors adoption of consumer directed care and the debate about ‘overheads’ that this has raised. The arguements put forward in this article could be adapted and expanded to support the ‘overheads’ in consumer directed care.

Activities help make bonds – this is a community news story on the WA NFP Befriend which works to encourage social inclusion through events and activities. Visit http://befriend.org.au/ for more information about this local NFP.

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